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Sprites

For creating Art specifically, check out the For Artists page.

Sprites include anything used for Actors, such as characters, vehicles, turrets and parts of clothing such as hats, shirts, pants, etc. Sprites can also be used for menu buttons, banners, etc. for your Interfaces.

The buttons in the top-left corner of the window allow you to Manage your resources.

General

Display Name – is used to identify the Sprite in the editor.

Scripting ID – is used to identify the Sprite through scripting.

Category – is used to customize which area this Sprite belongs to. This means the Sprite will appear in the appropriate place on an Actor when they have it equipped.

Face – is used to import a graphic to represent a Sprite’s face. This can be used in Interfaces or displayed in dialogue boxes through the use of the “Advanced Message Box” event.

  • Affected by Sprite Color (left box) - controls which parts of the graphic will be affected by color tints that can be applied when creating a new Actor.
  • Unaffected by Sprite Color (right box) - controls which parts will not be tinted.
  • Face Render Layer - sets the ordering layer of the Face graphic.

Keep Resource in Memory - when ticked, the Sprite will stay in active memory (RAM).

Rotate Graphics with Direction - when ticked, the graphic will rotate as their direction changes but the Sprite will not change unless “Individual Directions” is also ticked. For flat graphics, like in top-down perspective games, you can tick this box to make a Sprite rotate when the direction is changed. This means you will not necessarily need to add animations for all directions.

Individual Directions - when ticked, you can add additional directions for “Rotate Graphics with Direction”.

Rotate Collision with Direction - when ticked, collisions will rotate along with the shape of the Sprite.


Edit Compression

Opens the Graphic Platform Compression window. This window is used to compress large graphics so that they take up less space on the video card. This is particularly useful for Android games.


Edit 3D Master Models

This option allows you to specify a master model(s) to open up the “Master Segment” option when creating a new Sprite animation.


Body Properties

Default Color(s) – sets the default color of a Body Sprite. When you create a new character the default color will be automatically selected.

Edit Valid Templates – sets which Actor Templates are allowed to use this Body Sprite. By default all of the Actor Templates are selected.

Edit Connections to Accessories – sets whether other Sprite categories can interact with your Body Sprite. For example: if you had a zombie Sprite and a torn “Shirt” Sprite you may set it up so that only the zombie can use the torn up shirt and not other characters, such as the main character.


Accessory Properties

These options only become available if you've selected a category other than “Body”:

Share Body Color - sets whether the Sprite uses the same body color as the relating body Sprite.

Equipment Exception - sets which category type can be equipped to this specific Sprite. This means you can make an exception to other equipment being set on top of this one, such as hats being used with hair.

Edit Connections to Bodies - sets which body Sprites this accessory Sprite can be attached to.


Pose

This section allows you to add animations to pre-defined actions such as “Walking” and “Jumping”.

Add Custom Pose – allows you to create your own poses which appear in the list to the right. You can then use the “Play Custom Pose” event in scripts in order to play this pose in-game.

Direction - the direction wheel allows you to select up to 8 separate directions to allow for alternative animations for various directions.


Graphics

Add Animation - this is for inserting a new Sprite animation in relation to the Pose options.

  • Blank Images - empty frames that you can edit in the Graphic Editor or replace with a graphic from your hard drive.
  • Image Files - import graphics that are stored on your hard drive.
  • Image Strip - add a Sprite sheet and specify the width/height of each frame and how many frames are on the Sprite sheet in order to create an animation.
  • 3D Model - import 3D models that are stored on your hard drive.
  • Master Segment - add a Master Model Segment and specify the animation index, start time and end time. This option only becomes available when 3D Master Models are specified (see above).

Name - sets the name of the selected animation.

Layer (Render) - is used to add layers to a Sprite so that a single Sprite can have multiple colors assigned to it. This means you aren't required to use the clothing system. The render priority determines which layer will appear first, with lower values being rendered first and higher values being rendered last.

Layer (Color) - is used to assign a different color layer value for each animation for a Sprite. You can have multiple colors displayed for a single category.

Shadow Distance - sets the distance in pixels that the shadow will be rendered away from the Sprite.

Lighting Mode - sets the lighting of the Sprite (note: does not apply to 3D models):

  • Disabled – no applied lighting (self-lit, extremely high performance)
  • Standard - front-lit only (lights behind it will not cause Sprite to light up)
  • Ambient - front-lit and partially lit from the back (default option)
  • Spherical - lit consistently from any direction (particularly useful for Sprites that always face the camera, also provides better performance)

Additive – when ticked, this will “add” color to the graphic rather than blending it in.

Smooth Scaling – when ticked, this will smooth the edges of a Sprite when scaled (anti-aliasing).

Color Unaffected – when ticked, the graphics color will be prevented from being altered when the Sprite’s color is changed.

Disable Lighting - when ticked, lighting of the graphic will be disabled.

Overlay – when ticked, the graphic in front of everything else will be rendered. It will also display it at its original scale.

Billboard – when ticked, the graphic will be drawn upright regardless of the orientation of the camera. This is particularly useful for Particle Effects.

Face Camera (X) – when ticked, this will ensure the graphic is facing the camera by only rotating it in the X axis (left-right).

Face Camera (Y) – when ticked, this will ensure the graphic is facing the camera by only rotating it in the Y axis (up-down).

Face Camera (Z) – when ticked, this will ensure the graphic is facing the camera by only rotating it in the Z axis (on its axis).

Tile Horizontally – when ticked, this will repeat the graphic along the horizontal (X) axis.

Tile Vertically (Y) – when ticked, this will repeat the graphic along the vertical (Y) axis.

Tile Vertically (Z) – when ticked, this will repeat the graphic along the vertical (Z) axis (applies to Platformer Game Projects).

Particle Generation - when ticked, this will enable the Particle Options button, allowing you to create Particle Effects.


Particle Generation

  • Lifetime (sec) – sets the minimum and maximum amount of time that a Particle Effect stays on screen.
  • Limit Amount – sets the minimum and maximum amount of Sprites that will appear on screen during its lifetime.
  • Starting Size (%) – sets the minimum and maximum starting size of your Sprite as a percentage (100% is the actual size of your Sprite).
  • Starting Rotation – sets the minimum and maximum starting rotation of your Sprite from 0 to 359 degrees.
  • Starting Distance X – sets the minimum and maximum starting distance your Sprite has along the horizontal axis.
  • Starting Distance Y – sets the minimum and maximum starting distance your Sprite has along the vertical axis.
  • Starting Distance Z – sets the minimum and maximum starting distance your sprite has along the vertical axis (applies to Platformer Game Projects).
  • Starting Speed X – sets the minimum and maximum starting speed your Sprite has along the horizontal axis.
  • Starting Speed Y – sets the minimum and maximum starting speed your Sprite has along the vertical axis.
  • Starting Speed Z – sets the minimum and maximum starting speed your Sprite has along the vertical axis (applies to Platformer Game Projects).
  • Starting Color – sets the minimum and maximum starting color of your Sprite.
  • Starting Opacity – sets the minimum and maximum starting opacity of your Sprite.
  • Position Relative to Source (no trailing) – when ticked, this will position the Sprite relative to where it was created so there is no trailing.
  • Frequency (sec) – sets the minimum and maximum frequency in which new Sprites appear during its lifetime. For example: if you have a limit amount of 10 sprites that have to appear within a 1 second lifetime and you set the frequency to 0.01 seconds then all of the Sprites will appear in just 0.1 seconds and then stay on screen until the 1 second lifetime has ended.
  • Size Change (%) – sets the minimum and maximum size change of your Sprite during the lifetime of the Particle Effect, as a percentage.
  • Rotation Change – sets the minimum and maximum rotation change of your Sprite during the lifetime of the Particle Effect, from 0 to 359 degrees.
  • Speed Change X – sets the minimum and maximum horizontal speed change of your Sprite during the lifetime of the Particle Effect.
  • Speed Change Y – sets the minimum and maximum vertical speed change of your Sprite during the lifetime of the Particle Effect.
  • Speed Change Z – sets the minimum and maximum vertical speed change of your Sprite during the lifetime of the Particle Effect Platformer Game Projects).
  • Ending Color – sets the minimum and maximum ending color of your Sprite.
  • Ending Opacity – sets the minimum and maximum ending opacity of your Sprite.
  • Rotate with Direction – when ticked, this will rotate the Sprite depending on the direction it is moving in.

Graphic Scripting

This section allows your Sprite to retrieve specific data such as position, size, rotation, color, etc. and apply them to itself. For example: you could use the ‘Retrieve Position X’ box to move the sprite along the horizontal axis depending on the value stored inside a Global Variable.


Sequencer

The Sequencer can be used to create smooth transitions between frames. For example: you can create a tween between frames by placing your Sprite on the left side of the preview window, creating a second frame and then moving the second Sprite over to the right side. It will automatically create a smooth transition so that the Sprite doesn’t suddenly appear over to the right but actually moves over to the right instead.

Pose Length - sets the amount of frames an animation takes.

Pose sec/frame - sets how many frames play per second.

Sequence Mode - choose whether a Sprite will loop continuously (Loop) or play only once (Once).


Sequence Editor

Click on the preview window in the bottom-right corner of the Sprite Editor to open the Sequence Editor. Here you can modify a Sprite's animation, collision and holding points.

Insert

  • Animation – is used to place a new instance of your animation that you can then manipulate to create more complex animations.
  • Rectangle Collision – is used to create a rectangle collision box around your Sprite in order to give it substance in-game.
  • Polygon Collision – is used to create a polygonal collision box around your Sprite in order to give it substance in-game.
  • Sphere/Capsule Collision - is used to create a circle or cylinder collision box around your Sprite in order to give it substance in-game.
  • Mesh Collision - is used to create a mesh collision based on a 3D Model in order to create heightmaps for 3D games.
  • Holding Point (1-4) – are used to create different holding points for your Sprites so that they will carry weapons and other Items. The placement of your holding points is where the Item will appear on the Sprite in-game.
  • Bullet Point (1-4) - are used to create different bullet points for your Sprites for determining where projectile Items will spawn from (eg: a rocket from a rocket launcher).
  • Node Position - sets the X, Y and Z position. You will need to adjust the holding point(s) per frame (depending on if there is any animation going on).
  • Node Magnification - sets the X, Y and Z size as a percentage (%).
  • Node Rotation - sets the X, Y and Z rotation. Whilst working with a 45 degree camera, set this value to +Y. For a top-down camera set it to +Z.
  • Camera Focus Point - is used to create an offset for the focus of the camera when telling 001 Game Creator to focus on an Actor or Player.

Tools

  • Move – is used to move your Sprite around.
  • Resize – is used to make your Sprite bigger or smaller.
  • Rotate on Axis – is used to rotate your Sprite in any direction on its axis.
  • Free Rotate – is used to rotate your Sprite in any direction on any axis.

Options

  • Show Grid – is used to turn the 32 x 32 pixel grid on or off.
  • Snap to Grid – is used to turn snapping on or off (snapping is quite useful for lining up your Sprites).
  • Background Color – is used to toggle the background color of the preview window from black to white.
  • Lighting - is used to toggle the lighting of the Sprite on or off. Use the “Light Location” dial to change the direction of the lighting.
  • Preview Once – is used to preview your animation once.
  • Preview Continuously – is used to preview your animation and then continue to loop until told to stop.
  • More… - this window allows you to preview different held Items for each holding point you’ve placed, show/hide holding points and collisions in the preview window and show/hide layers from other poses in the preview window as well.

Preview

This is used to see your animation in different camera views. 001 Game Creator will automatically select the view that is appropriate to your project.

The Action / RPG Project Template will automatically choose the “45°” view.

The Platformer Game Project Template will automatically use the “Front” view.

You can also preview Sprites on an Interface by selecting the “Int.” view.

sprites.txt · Last modified: 2017/02/01 07:09 by Lee